16-03-23_EdwardKeinholz-FiveCarStudDiner2Tango

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Edward Keinholz Art: The Five Car Stud – 1969 | The Portable War Memorial – 1968 | It Takes Two to Integrate (Cha, Cha, Cha) – 1961

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Edward Keinholz

Edward Kienholz (October 23, 1927 – June 10, 1994) was an American installation artist and assemblage sculptor whose work was highly critical of aspects of modern life. From 1972 onwards, he assembled much of his artwork in close collaboration with his artistic partner and fifth wife, Nancy Reddin Kienholz. Throughout much of their career, the work of the Kienholzes was more appreciated in Europe than in their native United States, though American museums have featured their art more prominently since the 1990s. Art critic Brian Sewell called Edward Kienholz “the least known, most neglected and forgotten American artist of Jack Kerouac’s Beat Generation of the 1950s, a contemporary of the writers Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs and Norman Mailer, his visual imagery at least as grim, gritty, sordid and depressing as their literary vocabulary”. Most of Keinholz art is created from trash; and is highly critical of aspects of alleged civilized modern life.

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Edward Keinholz Art: The Five Car Stud – 1969

Edward Keinholz Art: The Five Car Stud – 1969

Five Car Stud, 1969-72. In this life size depiction of a racially motivated castration and slaying, five cars drive to the scene on the crime to enjoy the ‘game’ of sterilizing a nigger. Reflecting the manner in which Africans and Black Americans have been targeted for genocide by the same global industrialists that have hailed Keinholz ‘art’, this work may be seen much like Norman Mailer viewed grotesque war scenes on television in Why We are In Vietnam – familiarity to the vivid violence breeds acceptance. Keinholz, like other ‘artists’ made famous by the cryptocracy, serves his psyops function. – Leonard Horowitz: Globalism, Terrorism and Toxic Warfare.

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The Portable War Memorial – 1968

The Portable War Memorial – 1968

The Portable War Memorial, 1968. Produced during the Vietnam war, this most famous and most famously contrived American war photograph of soldiers erecting the flag on Iwo Jima, stands adjacent a list of 475 nations extinct because of wars. The power of the work, claimed the Whitney Museum, emanates from the location of this heroic act: the American diner metaphorically extending the war machine into the realm of consumption. That is precisely what was socially engineered as directed by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund in 1961 with reports that drafted a National Purpose for America that linked guns, butter and the new technology for weapons production to the cause of Freedom and the Free World. – Leonard Horowitz: Death in the Air: Globalism, Terrorism and Toxic Warfare.

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It Takes Two to Integrate (Cha, Cha, Cha) – 1961

It Takes Two to Integrate (Cha, Cha, Cha) – 1961

It Takes Two to Integrate, 1961. Keinholz’s art deflty depicts American blue collar racism, but conveniently conceals the white collar eugenics programs of his benefactors. – Leonard Horowitz: Death in the Air: Globalism, Terrorism and Toxic Warfare.

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