Large: 17-08-20_BrotherNo1PolPotWasRight


Saperstein Citizens: Religious Fanatics with a small degree of — cooperate with the State to implement EoP intnl law — Rationality

You realize I am a religious fanatic; but there is small degree of rationality in me. If someone had come to me & said [voting to support EoP intnl law] to give up [overbreeding / consumption], would benefit the safety of Israel. … We will [cooperate & ration; or] pack our bags & go. – [EoP Amended] Moshe Saperstein; Highway 51: Withdrawal from Gaza.

Gen Hacohen, Ordered by PM Sharon to be Commander of Disengagement from Gaza:

BG: PM Arik Sharon, Attaturk & Fanatics with a small degree of rationality:

“He was a senior commander who went with his units from house to house, from bunker to bunker, from orange grove to orange grove; to explain what he meant. And three months later, Gaza was quiet. Terrorism was crushed with an iron fist, with a cruel hand. He cast fear into Gaza. …. They were afraid of him, really scared. He explained to me once in a very simple manner; that he went to put an end to terrorism in Gaza. He was head of Southern Command. His method was simple. Every Arab caught holding a weapon; was shot on the spot.” — Eli Landau & Uri Avnery; Anna Bens: Israels Generals: Ariel Sharon.

“Attaturk knew that for his movement to succeed and be permanent. He had to create a struggle that was initiated and supported by the people. Everything had to be legitimate and ideologically well-founded. A revolutionary ideal at the time it was announced to the whole country from the city of Amasia.” – Mark Campbell: Mustafa Kemal Attuturk: Attaturk the Feminist Warrior.

“We wanted our approach and modus operandi to be clearly understood and that we would not need to explain what we were doing. I would compare this to a statue set up in a town, such as Rodin’s “Burghers of Calais”, for example. If you have to explain the meaning or the idea, the artist has failed in his intention. We all in fact knew that the entire operation would so to speak take place on stage, with us as the actors, watched by 8,000 journalists from around the world. These had come to show the world how Jews treat their brothers during a sort of civil war. Without wishing to blow my own trumpet, I can say that we created a unique, historic situation. We were involved in a real confrontation and conflict that was extremely painful for all concerned. Despite everything, we succeeded, in part because we had clearly delineated boundaries within which to contain events, so that no blood would be shed. This was the spirit in which we worked, striking the balance between essentially Jewish behavior and the necessities of a military operation.” – Maj Gen Gershon Hacohen; Shalom Magazine: Sensitivity and Determination.

On Superbowl Sunday, Israeli PM Netanyahu released his shalom conditional peace promise to be a good prime minister babysitter ad. – Now This News: Netanyahu Promises Israelis He’d Be A Good Babysitter.

As Army Chief of Staff, I was in no position to say if I was for or against the evacuation. It was my duty to analyze the possible pros and cons. When asked whether Gaza is a strategic military asset to the State of Israel, I said no. On the other hand, leaving Gaza without controls in place, could turn the Gaza strip into a strategic threat. I thought that if we do leave Gaza, it be contingent on the Palestinians paying a heavy price. That didn’t happen. .. How did we get to this situation that it is legitimate to evacuate Jews from Palestinian State land, but not Palestinians from Jewish State land? .. If there was good will then these things could be settled.. coexistence. Why does it have to end up in war? … These days there is talk within Israel about a unilateral withdrawal. But what moves can you make when the other side doesn’t even accept your very existence, and any border you draw, will be the border from which they’ll continue to fight you. … It’s easy to label people. He’s right wing, don’t talk to him. She’s left wing, don’t listen to her. – Moshe Bogi Ya’alon, Former: Israel Defence Forces: Chief of Staff; Highway 51: Withdrawal from Gaza.

It’s your right as a citizen to consider the government corrupt, and go to a more enlightened place. However once the government decides; not to obey, is destructive. You can now kiss the entire State of Israel goodbye. Why? Because democracy is important. That’s what gives us the tools to deal with all our external enemies, and internal problems, and we have plenty of both. … Trying to understand a person who is logical, but his logic is based on faith, is very difficult to understand. … Honestly my words were meant to calm, and to ease the swallowing of the pill. But this pill was bitter and it remained bitter. I was never able to convince anyone to leave their home, without them resisting in some way.. – Dudi Chaloni, IDF Soldier; Highway 51: unSettled / Withdrawal from Gaza.

Its clear when you want to survive in the Middle East, where power dictates, and every time you make a good-will gesture; it is interpreted as a sign of weakness or fear, then you need to prove your might all over again. That’s the Middle East, power is the driving force. Don’t fool yourself, give up all the territories, and even if you’re left standing on one leg, on one floor tile, in the middle of Tel Aviv, they’ll probably make demands on that floor tile as well. ….. Every person who lives in the State of Israel expands the borders of Israel. You live on the land, you determine the border. Like its done all over the world, from antiquity to modern times. And today’s debate over issues like ’48 borders or ’67 borders, in my opinion, seems insignificant, in relation to the history of the people of Israel, in the State of Israel.- Meir Shimoni; Highway 51: Withdrawal from Gaza.

The borders of the State of Israel are what God gave us in the Bible. Political circumstances may be such that we cannot occupy those borders at a particular time, but it is according to the Bible simply forbidden, to give up what you possess. You realize of course that I am a religious fanatic; but there is some small degree of rationality in me. If someone had come to me and said that giving up Gaza and Northern Samaria, would actually benefit the safety of the rest of Israel. Even though I believe it’s a mistake, I can understand it. We will pack our bags and we can go. But nobody, not the government, not the United Nations, not the United States, you name it. Nobody has explained what the benefit is to Israel for pulling out of here. And all I ever hear is Give Peace a Chance. Leaving here is a bold move for peace. What bold move for peace? It’s absolutely senseless. …. Everyone out here is so laid back, they are practically laid out. I would have preferred an old age home. Its true, I’ve been ready for an old age home since my Bar Mitzvah, but since she calls the shots, and wanted to go out and have an adventure, before they send us to the glue factory.. We came out here. –  [EoP Bold Emphasis] Moshe Saperstein; Highway 51: Withdrawal from Gaza.
» 17 Jul: EoP Axis, Wikileaks, B Blanton: EoP TRC Draft Statements; CC: Gen Hacohen & Al Sisi.
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Saloth Sar aka Pol Pot aka Brother Number One

Pol Pot (19 May 1925 – 15 April 1998, born Saloth Sar) was a Cambodian politician and revolutionary who led the Khmer Rouge from 1963 until 1997. From 1963 to 1981, he served as the General Secretary of the Communist Party of Kampuchea. As such, he became the leader of Cambodia on 17 April 1975, when his forces captured Phnom Penh. From 1976 to 1979, he also served as the Prime Minister of Democratic Kampuchea (30th Prime Minister of Cambodia).
He presided over a totalitarian dictatorship, in which his government made urban dwellers move to the countryside to work in collective farms and on forced labour projects. The combined effects of executions, strenuous working conditions, malnutrition and poor medical care caused the deaths of approximately 25 percent of the Cambodian population. In all, an estimated 1 to 3 million people (out of a population of slightly over 8 million) perished as a result of the policies of his four-year premiership.
After Cambodia lost the Cambodian–Vietnamese War in 1979, Pol Pot relocated to the jungles of southwest Cambodia, and the Khmer Rouge government collapsed. From 1979 to 1997, he and a remnant of the old Khmer Rouge operated near the border of Cambodia and Thailand. Until 1993, they clung to power as part of a coalition government that was internationally recognized as the rightful government of Cambodia. Pol Pot died on 15 April 1998, while under house arrest by the Ta Mok faction of the Khmer Rouge. Since his death, rumours that he committed suicide or was poisoned have persisted.


Pol Pot Quotes

There’s what we did wrong and what we did right. The mistake is that we did some things against the people — by us and also by the enemy — but the other side, as I told you, is that without our struggle there would be no Cambodia right now. – Pol Pot.

Saloth Sar moved to Paris to finish his studies, and it was here he became active in communist groups and circles, embracing the ideology of a classless society. The most striking part of this read was the normalcy with which Pol Pot was presented, as if anyone, if given the right mix of circumstances, could fill his shoes. Further online reading discussed one detention center in particular during Khmer Rouge rule in Cambodia, S-21, where only seven of the 20,000 inmates were rumored to have lived. – David P Chandler; Brother Number One: A Political Biography of Pol Pot.


Statements of Apology

Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia: Statements of Apology: 18 August 2009: Kaing Guek Eav.

He said that he knows that many people in the country hate him and think he’s responsible for the killings. He said that he knows many people died. When he said this he nearly broke down and cried. He said he must accept responsibility because the line was too far to the left, and because he didn’t keep proper track of what was going on. He said he was like the master in a house he didn’t know what the kids were up to, and that he trusted people too much. For example, he allowed [one person] to take care of central committee business for him, [another person] to take care of intellectuals, and [a third person] to take care of political education…. These were the people to whom he felt very close, and he trusted them completely. Then in the end … they made a mess of everything…. They would tell him things that were not true, that everything was fine, that this person or that was a traitor. In the end they were the real traitors. – David P. Chandler, Brother Number One: A Political Biography of Pol Pot.


Brother Number One: Pol Pot, Kerry & Rob Hamill

The desire for forgiveness is everywhere in this haunting, hopeful film – Bill Gosden

Through Rob Hamill’s personal story, Brother Number One explores one of the “forgotten” genocides of the 20th century, examining how and why nearly 2 million Cambodians could be killed by a fanatical regime known as the Khmer Rouge.
“Brother Number One” was the name that Pol Pot, the leader of the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime of Cambodia, gave himself. Kerry Hamill was also “brother number one” the oldest boy in the large Hamill family of Whakatane, New Zealand. In 1978, the lives of the two “brother number ones” collided.
Kerry Hamill was on board his charter yacht Foxy Lady with two other men when they anchored at Koh Tang Island to shelter from a storm. His girlfriend Gail had recently left the yacht to visit family in Hawai’i. Unbeknownst to them they had entered Kampuchean waters, neither did they know of the horror story that was unfolding on the mainland.
They had sailed from the hippie era of “love and freedom” into Year Zero. Along with Englishman John Dewhirst, Kerry was seized and tortured for two months at the Khmer Rouge slaughterhouse, Tuol Sleng (S21). After signing confessions taken under duress that “admitted” CIA affiliations, they were executed on Comrade Duch’s orders. A third companion Canadian Stuart Glass was shot and killed when the boat was captured. Some would say he was the lucky one.
Brother Number One follows Kerry’s youngest brother Rob Hamill, an Olympic and Trans-Atlantic rowing champion, in his quest for justice. It was during the Atlantic row, 41 days of solitude at sea and exhaustion, that Rob began to properly grieve for Kerry and came to the realization that he would have to do something to honour his brother’s memory. Then, some years later, he heard that finally there was to be a war crimes tribunal process and he decided to participate, signing up to give a Victim’s Statement at the ECCC. As well as giving his statement, Rob attempts to discover the most probable scenario surrounding the capture, incarceration, and murders of his brother and sailing companions. He travels with Cambodian translator Kulikar Sotho, a survivor of the killing fields who will tell her story in parallel with Rob’s. Together they explore the devastating impact of Pol Pot’s maniacal ideology—which saw 2 million killed through execution, starvation and sheer hard work. The film interweaves the history of Cambodia with their journey. The former French colony was sucked into the Cold War; bombed illegally by Nixon and Kissinger; suffered four years of Khmer Rouge brutality; was invaded by the Vietnamese; then in a twist of realpolitik, saw the greatest war criminals since the Third Reich aided and abetted by China, the US and the Western powers. Many Cambodians today remain ignorant of their history, their lives marked by poverty, HIV, and violence.
Rob’s journey culminates in a confrontation in court with Kaing Khek Iev, better known as Comrade Duch, former Commander at S-21, who gave the final orders for Kerry and John to be tortured and killed. Up to 14,000 Cambodians met the same end in the notorious prison. After 30 years of impunity, Duch and four former “Brothers” are currently standing trial for Crimes Against Humanity, homicide and torture in the Extraordinary Chamber in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), a war crimes tribunal that was finally established this year after a decade of international wrangling. In July 2010, Duch was sentenced to 35 years in prison, which was reduced to 19 years for time spent in detention and mitigating circumstances. Both the defense and prosecution has appealed.
Brother Number One grapples with the struggle to forgive versus the anger that Rob feels, the same trauma that grips a whole country and the global Cambodian community.
Brother Number One – Film. Trailer.


Pol Pot Was Right

Pol Pot bears little resemblance to more familiar communist revolutionaries. Marx, Engels, Lenin & co. were intellectuals who saw the revolution in terms of a superior “scientific” understanding of the forces of history. Also, they saw the industrial working class as the most important force in revolutionary change. Pol Pot’s Cambodia almost entirely lacked a proletariat and he was hostile to those who did exist. He was an anti-intellectual who based his revolution on the peasantry, as far removed from Marx’s comments on “the idiocy of rural life” as it was possible to be. In fact, his role model seems to have been Jack Cade; I don’t mean the real historical figure, but the character in Henry VI, Part 2, who wants to start by killing all the lawyers and executing everyone who can read and write. This was Shakespeare’s grammar school boys’ nightmare and the Khmer Rouge under Pol Pot killed people for wearing spectacles, having professional qualifications or having pale skin.
Nevertheless, I concluded that though Pol Pot’s revolution was the most abhorrent of revolutions it was also the most coherent. The Khmer Rouge evacuated cities: most notoriously they insisted on evacuating Phnom Penh as soon as they captured it in April 1975. This was a ridiculous thing to do even on its own terms since it clogged up all the roads; at least twenty thousand people died in the first three days of the attempted evacuation. Later, they abolished money. All ludicrous and lunatic we might agree. But Pol Pot argued that if you allowed people to live an urban life there would be a division of labour, exchages and accumulation and these would amount to capitalism. Memorably he remarked that if the people were allowed to return to the cities capitalism would re-emerge “within an hour”. Money allows accumulation, individualism, security and some independence, making socialism impossible. Socialism can only be achieved by remorseless and exhausting contact with the land, which alone can make humans as equal as blackbirds (though party leaders and enforcers, as necessary roles for the enforcement of equality, have, of course, to be treated unequally).
And here we must agree with Pol Pot. Subsequent history has proved him right: seventy years of supposedly trying to develop a new “homo Sovieticus” collapsed into a robber baron form of capitalism more or less within an hour. China took a more evolutionary pace of journey to capitalism. A genuine anti-capitalism denies the fundamental instincts of competion, accumulation and the search for security which define us not just as humans, but as mammals.
– Lincoln Allison: Pol Pot Was Right.


Brat – Brother – All the Kremlin’s Underdog Goodguy Gangsters – Watermelon Assassination Escape on Tram – DiY Cannonball Gunpowder.

Brat/Brother: Brat/Brother (Russian: Брат, translit. Brat) is a 1997 Russian crime film directed by Aleksei Balabanov. The film stars Sergei Bodrov Jr. as Danila Bagrov, a young Russian ex-conscript. The character of Danila is considered by many in Russia to be an icon of the early post-Soviet period. Brother unexpectedly became one of the most commercially successful Russian films released in the 1990s and quickly became a cult film throughout Russia. Due to the film’s popularity and fan demand, a sequel, Brother 2, was released in 2000. Brother 2 is notable for having a significantly higher budget, more emphasis on action sequences, and taking place in Moscow and Chicago.
In the autumn of 1997, Danila Bagrov (Sergei Bodrov Jr.) returns to his small hometown of Priozersk following his demobilization from the Russian Army after the First Chechen War. Before he reaches home, he ends up in a fight with security guards, after he accidentally walks onto the set of a music video for the band Nautilus Pompilius. After Danila rejects a job offer from the chief of the local militsiya, who was a classmate of Danila’s deceased father, he is released, on the condition that he will find work within the week. His mother insists that he travels to St. Petersburg to seek out his successful older brother Viktor, whom his mother is confident will help him make a living.
Danila travels to the city, but his attempts to make contact with Viktor are unsuccessful. Instead, he travels around the city and befriends several people from a very wide urban spectrum: Kat (Mariya Zhukova), an energetic drug addict and party-girl, and “German” Hoffman (Yury Kuznetsov), a homeless street vendor whom Danila helps after a thug attempts to extort him. Danila knocks the thug unconscious and takes a revolver from his pocket.
Unbeknown to their mother, Viktor (Viktor Sukhorukov) is an accomplished hitman who goes by the street name “Tatar” but is growing too independent and is starting to irritate his mob boss “Roundhead” (Sergei Murzin). His latest target is “Chechen”, a Chechen mafia boss who was recently released from prison and runs an open-air market. Roundhead, who is unhappy with the amount of money that Viktor demanded for the hit, orders his thugs to secretly watch him.
When Danila finally finds Viktor’s apartment, he is welcomed by Viktor. To avoid exposure, Viktor passes his assignment to his brother, gives him money to settle into the city, and then lies to him that the Chechen has been extorting from him, and asks Danila to perform the hit. Although Danila claims that his army service was spent at the headquarters as a clerk, he carries out the task professionally. First, he asks German to find him a room in a communal flat in the city center (much to the dismay of the old alcoholic landlord who threatens to shoot German with his vintage hunting rifle, as revenge for World War II). He then constructs a makeshift silencer out of a plastic soda bottle and an oil filter, as well as a decoy firecracker out of a matchbox. Finally, he follows Chechen and, despite the latter’s security, takes him out without being spotted. As Danila makes his exit, Roundhead’s thugs spot him and chase him. Making his escape, Danila jumps into a freight tram and, despite being wounded in the abdomen, manages to kill one of the pursuing thugs.
The tram driver, a woman named Sveta (Svetlana Pismichenko), helps Danila escape. Later, despite her marriage to an abusive husband, the two begin an affair. Danila later recovers, with German’s help. With the money given to him by Viktor after the hit, he begins to enjoy St. Petersburg, gives his provincial image a makeover, goes to a concert with Sveta to see his favorite band, Nautilus Pompilius, and manages to scare away her husband. He meets up with Kat to go to a nightclub and then smokes cannabis in an afterparty, where he taunts a French tourist whom he mistakes for an American. The night ends with him sleeping with Kat.
Roundhead’s loss of a thug and the fact that Viktor employed Danila to carry out the hit aggravates him even more. He decides to draw him into a combined raid. Once again Viktor, suspecting a trap, passes the job to Danila. The two thugs raid the apartment, but their main target is away. While they wait, in an apartment on the floor above, a party is taking place with several well-known Russian rock stars. A young radio director, Stepan (Andrey Fedortsov) mistakes the raided flat for the party flat and is almost killed by the thugs, who take him as a hostage. Vyacheslav Butusov, the lead singer of Nautilus Pompilius, makes the same mistake, but Danila instead follows Butusov above and relaxes in the friendly musical atmosphere. Realizing the balance between right and wrong, he comes downstairs and finds that the thugs have just killed their main target, and are about to do the same with Stepan. Instead, Danila kills both thugs. Danila and Stepan drag the corpses to the Smolensky Lutheran Cemetery, where German and his friends dwell. Once again, German helps Danila by disposing of the bodies.
Roundhead is furious upon finding out what happened. Instead of going after Tatar, he decides to track Danila and intercepts Sveta’s tram. They later raid her apartment, where his men beat and rape her, and learn his phone number, as well as his address. A henchman nicknamed “Mole” ambushes Danila near his apartment building, but the bullet hits Danila’s music player, giving him a chance to fire back and kill Mole. Realizing that staying home is unsafe, he travels to Sveta’s house and is shocked at her state. Initially thinking it was her husband, he then learns who was responsible and realizes that the only way they could have tracked Sveta was when he returned a phone call from her home telephone to his brother.
At the same time, Roundhead raids Viktor’s apartment and forces him to call Danila at gunpoint, so that he comes to pick up his payment. Realizing the depth of the situation, Danila decides to end it all at once. He goes back to the communal room that he was renting, buys the rifle from the old man, converts it into a sawed-off shotgun, and replaces the duck-hunting pellets with nailheads. At Viktor’s apartment, he makes easy work of Roundhead and two of his henchmen and tells the surviving thug to warn the rest of the gang that anyone who hurts his brother will be killed. In reply, the thug tells him that it was Viktor who turned him in.
Danila forgives his brother, gives him some of the money from Roundhead’s suitcase (keeping the rest for himself) and then tells him to return home and to work for the militsiya. Danila decides to go to Moscow, as St. Petersburg, according to Viktor, “is a pretty town, but provincial nonetheless”. Once again he visits Sveta, intending to take her with him, but her husband has returned and is beating her. Seeing Danila, he challenges him to a fight, but before he can come closer, Danila fires a shot into his leg. Sveta rushes to her husband and begins to treat his wound. Danila urges her to come with him, but she tells him to get out and never come back. He leaves her a Nautilus Pompilius CD. He then meets up with German, converses with him about the influence of the city on its residents, saying that everyone is weak here, to which German replies that the city is an evil that drains the strength from those who enter it. Danila offers him money, but German declines, saying “What’s good for the Russian is death for the German”. Before he leaves the city, he finds Kat to say goodbye. She is indifferent to his departure, but he gives her money nonetheless.
The last scene of the film shows Danila walking out of a snow-covered forest. He hitches a ride to Moscow on a passing Kamaz truck. As he chats up with the driver, the final shot is of the winter road stretching far into the wilderness.

Brat means Brother in English: Movie.
One of the most popular Russian films of the 2000s was Brat-2, a sequel to the equally popular Brat, about small-time gangsters trying to eke out a living among the economic chaos and corruption at the end of the Yeltsin era. Both movies spawned a number of popular phrases and were quoted regularly. In the second movie, much of which is set in the U.S. and which came out just three days after Putin’s 2000 inauguration, one of the Russian heroes turns to his American counterpart and says: “So tell me, American, what is power? Is it really money? That’s what my brother says, money is power. You have a lot of money, but so what? I think the truth is power. Whoever has truth on their side is the more powerful.” For Putin and many of Russia’s citizens, this image of the tough, street-hardened, wily underdog getting the better of its slicker, richer but weaker opponent is one they nurture and cherish.
– Russia Direct: All the Kremlin’s Men: Inside Russia’s Political System.
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